Employment and wages2014 Edition

Insee, in collaboration with Dares and Drees, presents through this new edition of “Employment and salaries” a complete overview about these two topics.

Insee Références
Paru le : 17/09/2014
Consulter

In 2013, the losses in market sector employment eased and real wages rose owing to low inflation

Nathan Rémila, Frédéric Tallet

In a context of ongoing weak economic growth, the losses in market sector employment continued in 2013, albeit at a slower rate than in 2012, mainly because of stabilisation and the increase in temporary work at the end of 2013. In construction and industry, job losses increased. Market sector services excluding temporary work also saw a fall in employment, while they were the main contributor to the increase in employment before the crisis. Self-employment, which benefited between 2009 and 2011 from the effects of the introduction of the status of auto-entrepreneur, witnessed a growth rate close to the one it enjoyed prior to the crisis. The working population, which had increased sharply over the last few years due to a rise in the rate of employment among older workers, fell away in 2013. The slowdown in the rate of employment among older workers together with demographic changes among people under 50 years of age were the cause for this. Unemployment as defined by the ILO stabilised in 2013; it fell back sharply for young people but continued to rise for those aged 25-49 and to a lesser extent among older workers. The unemployment level remained high in 2013 and weighed on growth in nominal wages, with employee bargaining power being more limited in this context. Low economic growth and the moderate revaluation of the guaranteed minimum wage (SMIC) as of 1 January 2013 led to a slower increase in wages in current euros in 2013. However, lower inflation allowed for an increase in real wages. Contrary to the previous years, these increased as much in construction and the service sector as in industry.

Insee Références
Paru le : 17/09/2014