France, social portrait2016 Edition

France, Social Portrait is for everyone who would like to learn more about French society. This cross-cutting publication in the “Insee Références” collection throws the spotlight on young people in France. Three reports provide an in-depth analysis of different aspects of French society. Around forty themed information sheets summarise the main data and provide European comparisons, to complete this social panorama.

Insee Références
Paru le : 22/11/2016
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The educational achievements of immigrants’ children at junior high school are linked more to the cultural capital of their families than to their migrant past

Jean-Paul Caille, Ariane Cosquéric, Émilie Miranda, Louise Viard-Guillot

Immigrants’ children constitute a population on average less advantaged than other pupils. However, their success at junior high school is very unequal, varying according to the characteristics of their family background: when they are compared one with another, it is always when the family has a greater cultural capital that their chances of success are highest. In addition, their success is not unrelated to the number of siblings: when there are more than three children, school trajectories and level of achievement deteriorate as the number of siblings increases. Given comparable family and social characteristics, the educational achievements of immigrants’ children varies according to the parents’ country of origin. But this disparity in achievement is due essentially to the educational excellence of children from South-East Asia who substantially outperform other pupils. However, the success of immigrants’ children does not appear to be strongly linked with the time their mother has spent in France or her level of linguistic integration. Pupils born abroad and who have therefore themselves experienced migration come in sixth place for their achievements in French and maths where they are less confident than other immigrants’ children, but they catch up in junior high school. Girls perform better than boys in French and they are less likely to repeat a year. This is clearly seen from the time they enter junior high school, and is strengthened considerably in the following years. Girls also catch up in maths, where their achievements had previously been poorer.

Insee Références
Paru le : 22/11/2016