Économie et Statistique n° 397 Why has the American Trade Balance Continued Deteriorating despite the Depreciation of the Dollar? - Older Workers, New Technology and Organisational Change - The Knock-on Effects of the Retirement Age

Economie et Statistique
Paru le : 01/02/2007
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Older Workers, New Technology and Organisational Change: A Re-examination following the Reponse Survey Further evidence using the Reponse Survey

Sévane Ananian et Patrick Aubert (un commentaire de Luc Behaghel)

Firms' use of technological innovations (computers, internet) or organisational, change, or their expansion into the international market raise the question of how older workers (seniors) adapt: Are the firms involved in these changes more likely to evict older workers from their workforce? An analysis of the workforce in 1998 confirms the hypothesis that these changes induce a bias unfavourable to older workers. In both manufacturing industry and services, the establishments that are more computerised or those that implement innovative workplace practices employ relatively fewer older workers. Roughly, this is true for both qualified workers (managers and intermediary professions) and less qualified workers (blue collars and employees). The causal link between innovation and the employment of older people is, because of its complexity, difficult to prove. However, the analysis of employment inflows and outflows between 1998 and 2001 confirms the idea that innovation worsens skill obsolescence. Affecting both hiring and firing, the increasing use of new technology seems to have a negative impact on the employment of older people.

Economie et Statistique
No 397
Paru le : 01/02/2007