Économie et Statistique n° 346-347 - The RMI: between redistribution and incentives

Economie et Statistique
Paru le : 01/01/2002
Consulter

Minimum Integration Income Recipient Job Seeking and Employability

Laurence Rioux

In January 1998, 26% of the individuals receiving minimum integration income in December 1996 had a job, 17% were out of the labour force and 57% were unemployed. Three-quarters of these jobseekers actively seek work and the most active in their search have a greater probability of finding a job. The job-seeking effort also affects the type of job found. The probability of the most active former jobseekers having a job on a long-term contract is higher than their probability of having a job on a fixed-term contract, which is itself higher than having a government-assisted job. Relative employment security is observed for recipients who take a first job, with four-fifths of those employed still in work nine months later and two-thirds still in work eighteen months later. For those who take a short-term job, being in a government-assisted job rather than on a fixed-term contract neither reduces nor increases the probability of still being employed a few months after the end of the contract. However, those on fixed-term contracts have a higher probability of finding a long-term contract than those in government-assisted jobs.

Economie et Statistique
No 346-347
Paru le : 01/01/2002