Économie et Statistique n° 369-370 Public Employment - Careers Professional - Mobility

Economie et Statistique
Paru le : 01/07/2004
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Tenured public servant mobility

Aline Pauron

The mobility of tenured public servants is studied from three points of view: geographic mobility (defined by a change of regional study and planning area (ZEAT) or department within a ZEAT), socio-economic mobility (change of socio-economic group) and structural mobility (change of ministry or service within a ministry). These definitions are fairly restrictive: geographic mobility does not include changes of establishment within a department, socio-economic mobility does not include changes of corps or rank within a socio-economic group, and structural mobility does not include a change of division within a ministerial department. Each type of mobility is measured as an annual rate for the years from 1989 to 2001. Geographic mobility is the most frequent, concerning an average 4.2% of staff every year. The Paris area accounts for the bulk of this mobility, which also concerns the south-eastern regions. Not including upgrading (from grade D to grade C and from primary school teacher to secondary school teacher), the annual rate of socio-economic mobility is approximately 3.5%. In nearly 90% of cases, this type of mobility relates to staff promotions. Structural mobility is in last place with a fairly erratic rate that fell from 2% in 1989 to 0.8% in 1996 before rising to 1.1% in 2000. In 90% of cases, this mobility concerned movements within ministries. Geographic mobility concerns more particularly young people and senior staff. Socio-economic mobility concerns first and foremost women in or at the end of their careers and the intermediate teaching professions (upgrading of primary school teachers to secondary school teachers). Structural mobility, like geographic mobility, concerns more young people and certain grades (administrative management, intermediate administrative professions, police and prisons). These three types of mobility are linked: some movements may relate to two types of mobility at the same time. This is particularly the ca

Economie et Statistique
No 369-370
Paru le : 01/07/2004